Sammy BG

Samuel Gultom,Sammy BG,baby,kids,health

Blog


Find more photos like this on Babble Playground
view:  full / summary

Swine Influenza (FAQ)

Posted by Samuel Gultom on April 28, 2009 at 4:23 AM Comments comments (0)

Swine Influenza and You

What is swine flu?

Swine Influenza (swine flu) is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that causes regular outbreaks in pigs. People do not normally get swine flu, but human infections can and do happen. Swine flu viruses have been reported to spread from person-to-person, but in the past, this transmission was limited and not sustained beyond three people.


Are there human infections with swine flu in the U.S.?

In late March and early April 2009, cases of human infection with swine influenza A (H1N1) viruses were first reported in Southern California and near San Antonio, Texas. Other U.S. states have reported cases of swine flu infection in humans and cases have been reported internationally as well. An updated case count of confirmed swine flu infections in the United States is kept at http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/investigation.htm CDC and local and state health agencies are working together to investigate this situation.


Is this swine flu virus contagious?

CDC has determined that this swine influenza A (H1N1) virus is contagious and is spreading from human to human. However, at this time, it not known how easily the virus spreads between people.


What are the signs and symptoms of swine flu in people?

The symptoms of swine flu in people are similar to the symptoms of regular human flu and include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people have reported diarrhea and vomiting associated with swine flu. In the past, severe illness (pneumonia and respiratory failure) and deaths have been reported with swine flu infection in people. Like seasonal flu, swine flu may cause a worsening of underlying chronic medical conditions.


How does swine flu spread?

Spread of this swine influenza A (H1N1) virus is thought to be happening in the same way that seasonal flu spreads. Flu viruses are spread mainly from person to person through coughing or sneezing of people with influenza. Sometimes people may become infected by touching something with flu viruses on it and then touching their mouth or nose.


How can someone with the flu infect someone else?

Infected people may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 7 or more days after becoming sick. That means that you may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while you are sick.


What should I do to keep from getting the flu?

First and most important: wash your hands. Try to stay in good general health. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food. Try not touch surfaces that may be contaminated with the flu virus. Avoid close contact with people who are sick.


Are there medicines to treat swine flu?

Yes. CDC recommends the use of oseltamivir or zanamivir for the treatment and/or prevention of infection with these swine influenza viruses. Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) that fight against the flu by keeping flu viruses from reproducing in your body. If you get sick, antiviral drugs can make your illness milder and make you feel better faster. They may also prevent serious flu complications. For treatment, antiviral drugs work best if started soon after getting sick (within 2 days of symptoms).


How long can an infected person spread swine flu to others?

People with swine influenza virus infection should be considered potentially contagious as long as they are symptomatic and possible for up to 7 days following illness onset. Children, especially younger children, might potentially be contagious for longer periods.


What surfaces are most likely to be sources of contamination?

Germs can be spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth. Droplets from a cough or sneeze of an infected person move through the air. Germs can be spread when a person touches respiratory droplets from another person on a surface like a desk and then touches their own eyes, mouth or nose before washing their hands.


How long can viruses live outside the body?

We know that some viruses and bacteria can live 2 hours or longer on surfaces like cafeteria tables, doorknobs, and desks. Frequent handwashing will help you reduce the chance of getting contamination from these common surfaces.


What can I do to protect myself from getting sick?

There is no vaccine available right now to protect against swine flu. There are everyday actions that can help prevent the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses like influenza. Take these everyday steps to protect your health:

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way. * Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you get sick with influenza, CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.


What is the best way to keep from spreading the virus through coughing or sneezing?

If you are sick, limit your contact with other people as much as possible. Do not go to work or school if ill. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick. Put your used tissue in the waste basket. Cover your cough or sneeze if you do not have a tissue. Then, clean your hands, and do so every time you cough or sneeze.


What is the best way to keep from spreading the virus through coughing or sneezing?

If you are sick, limit your contact with other people as much as possible. Do not go to work or school if ill. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick. Put your used tissue in the waste basket. Cover your cough or sneeze if you do not have a tissue. Then, clean your hands, and do so every time you cough or sneeze.


What is the best technique for washing my hands to avoid getting the flu?

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. Wash with soap and water. or clean with alcohol-based hand cleaner. we recommend that when you wash your hands -- with soap and warm water -- that you wash for 15 to 20 seconds. When soap and water are not available, alcohol-based disposable hand wipes or gel sanitizers may be used. You can find them in most supermarkets and drugstores. If using gel, rub your hands until the gel is dry. The gel doesn't need water to work; the alcohol in it kills the germs on your hands.


What should I do if I get sick?

If you live in areas where swine influenza cases have been identified and become ill with influenza-like symptoms, including fever, body aches, runny nose, sore throat, nausea, or vomiting or diarrhea, you may want to contact their health care provider, particularly if you are worried about your symptoms. Your health care provider will determine whether influenza testing or treatment is needed. If you are sick, you should stay home and avoid contact with other people as much as possible to keep from spreading your illness to others.

If you become ill and experience any of the following warning signs, seek emergency medical care. In children emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:


  • Fast breathing or trouble breathing
  • Bluish skin color
  • Not drinking enough fluids
  • Not waking up or not interacting
  • Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held
  • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough
  • Fever with a rash In adults, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:
  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
  • Sudden dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Severe or persistent vomiting


How serious is swine flu infection?

Like seasonal flu, swine flu in humans can vary in severity from mild to severe. Between 2005 until January 2009, 12 human cases of swine flu were detected in the U.S. with no deaths occurring. However, swine flu infection can be serious. In September 1988, a previously healthy 32-year-old pregnant woman in Wisconsin was hospitalized for pneumonia after being infected with swine flu and died 8 days later. A swine flu outbreak in Fort Dix, New Jersey occurred in 1976 that caused more than 200 cases with serious illness in several people and one death.


Can I get swine influenza from eating or preparing pork?

No. Swine influenza viruses are not spread by food. You cannot get swine influenza from eating pork or pork products. Eating properly handled and cooked pork products is safe.



H5N1 Case in Indonesia


A health official in indonesia reported yesterday that a hospitalised woman was tested positive for bird flu. indonesia has witnessed 52 deaths due to bird flue, the number being the highest of any country. Most of the deaths occurred from the beginning of this year.


"A 67-year-old woman living in the Cisarua area of Bandung had contact with fowl," the official from the bird flu information centre over telephone. "The woman was admitted to the hospital on Oct. 7 and was still alive, " the official added. "The woman tested positive to the H5N1 virus after a test at a health ministry laboratory and one conducted by NAMRU, the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit based in Jakarta," the official added.


Hadi Yusuf, the director of the Hasan Sadikin hospital in Bandung, southeast of the capital Jakarta, said, "The woman is being treated with the anti-viral drug Tamiflu and antibiotics. "Her condition is bad. For a second day, she has been on a respirator and her blood pressure is high." Yusuf said, "The woman had come down with a fever two weeks after being in the vicinity of dead chickens. " The indonesian government has not taken up mass culling of birds, in spite of the rise in the number of human deaths, mentioning the costs and uselessness in a big, densely populated country where a few fowls in the back yard is common.


Related Allert Issues:

Flue News Network

3 Hidden Ingrediant To Avoid

Posted by Samuel Gultom on April 24, 2009 at 12:22 AM Comments comments (0)

3 Hidden Ingredients to Avoid

Worried about your child's nutrition? Avoid trans fats, high-fructose corn syrup and food dyes By Shaun Dreisbach, Parenting


Weall want our kids to eat as healthfully as possible. But given their,um, picky parameters, you probably worry about them getting too muchsugar and fat and not enough actual nutrition. Bonnie Taub-Dix, R.D., aspokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, weighs in on theingredients worth avoiding.


Trans fats: This is one bad fatthat deserves to be on the zero-tolerance list. "Just be careful not toget so hung up on choosing foods that are trans-fat -- free that youforget to pay attention to how much saturated fat and calories theycontain," says Taub-Dix. Both types of fat contribute to heart diseaseand other health problems, and there are many foods with no trans fatsthat are loaded with cals.


High-fructose corn syrup:Treat it as you would any other added sweetener. "There's really nodifference between high-fructose corn syrup and regular sugar in termsof how it can affect your child's weight and health," says Taub-Dix.Just do your best to keep overall intake low because kids are generallyoversugared anyway.

 

 

Food dyes: Yourinstincts are right on. "A growing body of research has found anassociation between artificial colorings -- ones with numbers, such asYellow 5, Red 40, Blue 1, and Green 3 -- and behavior problems likehyperactivity," says Michael Jacobson, Ph.D., executive director of theCenter for Science in the Public Interest. The dyes, found ineverything from cake mixes and yogurts to breakfast cereals, are beingphased out in Europe, but consumption in the U.S. is on the upswing --it's increased fivefold over the past 30 years. "We don't know exactlywhy they have this effect, but they can have a big impact on some kids'behavior," adds Jacobson. "It's smart to choose foods without them whenyou can."

 


Ginseng At A Glance

Posted by Samuel Gultom on April 21, 2009 at 2:32 AM Comments comments (0)
Asian Ginseng

This fact sheet provides basic information about the herb Asian ginseng?common names, uses, potential side effects, and resources for more information. Asian ginseng is native to China and Korea and has been used in various systems of medicine for many centuries. Asian ginseng is one of several types of true ginseng (another is American ginseng, Panax quinquefolius).
An herb called Siberian ginseng or
eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is not a true ginseng.
Common Names?Asian ginseng, ginseng, Chinese ginseng, Korean ginseng, Asiatic ginseng
Latin Name?Panax ginseng

What It Is Used For
Treatment claims for Asian ginseng are numerous and include the use of the herb to support overall health and boost the immune system. Traditional and modern uses of ginseng include:
  • Improving the health of people recovering from illness
  • Increasing a sense of well-being and stamina, and improving both mental and physical performance
  • Treating erectile dysfunction, hepatitis C, and symptoms related to menopause
  • Lowering blood glucose and controlling blood pressure
How It Is Used
The root of Asian ginseng contains active chemical components called ginsenosides (or panaxosides) that are thought to be responsible for the herb?s medicinal properties. The root is dried and used to make tablets or capsules, extracts, and teas, as well as creams or other preparations for external use.

What the Science Says

  • Some studies have shown that Asian ginseng may lower blood glucose.Other studies indicate possible beneficial effects on immune function.
  • To date, research results on Asian ginseng are not conclusive enough to prove health claims associated with the herb. Only a handful of large clinical trials on Asian ginseng have been conducted.
  • Most studies have been small or have had flaws in design and reporting.
  • Some claims for health benefits have been based only on studies conducted in animals.
  • NCCAM supports studies to better understand the use of Asian ginseng. Areas of recent NCCAM-funded research include Asian ginseng?s interactions with other herbs and drugs and the herb?s potential to treat chronic lung infection, impaired glucose tolerance, and Alzheimer?s disease.

Side Effects and Cautions

  • When taken by mouth, ginseng is usually well tolerated. Some sources suggest that its use be limited to 3 months because of concerns about the development of side effects.
  • The most common side effects are headaches and sleep and gastrointestinal problems.
  • Asian ginseng can cause allergic reactions.
  • There have been reports of breast tenderness, menstrual irregularities, and high blood pressure associated with Asian ginseng products, but these products? components were not analyzed, so effects may have been due to another herb or drug in the product.
  • Asian ginseng may lower levels of blood sugar; this effect may be seen more in people withdiabetes. Therefore, people with diabetes should use extra caution with Asian ginseng, especially if they are using medicines to lower blood sugar or taking other herbs, such as bitter melon and fenugreek, that are also thought to lower blood sugar.
  • Tell your health care providers about any complementary and alternative practices you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.

Sources

Ginseng, Asian (Panax ginseng). In: Coates P, Blackman M, Cragg G, et al., eds. Encyclopedia of Dietary supplements.New York, NY: Marcel Dekker; 2005:265-277.
Ginseng, Panax. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at http://www.naturaldatabase.com on July 2, 2007.
Ginseng. Natural Standard Database Web site. Accessed at http://www.naturalstandard.com on June 28, 2007.
Ginseng root. In: Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckman J, eds. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Newton, MA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2000:170-177.
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Hepatitis C and Complementary and Alternative Medicine: 2003 Update. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Web site. Accessed at
http://nccam.nih.gov/health/hepatitisc/ on July 9, 2007.

For More Information
Visit the NCCAM Web site at nccam.nih.gov and view:
? What?s in the Bottle? An Introduction to Dietary Supplements at nccam.nih.gov/health/bottle/
? Herbal Supplements: Consider Safety, Too at nccam.nih.gov/health/supplement-safety/
NCCAM Clearinghouse
Toll-free in the U.S.: 1-888-644-6226
TTY (for deaf and hard-of-hearing callers): 1-866-464-3615
E-mail: info@nccam.nih.gov
CAM on PubMed
Web site: nccam.nih.gov/camonpubmed/
NIH Office of Dietary Supplements
Web site: www.ods.od.nih.gov
NIH National Library of Medicine?s MedlinePlus
Ginseng Listing: www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-ginseng.html
This publication is not copyrighted and is in the public domain. Duplication is encouraged.

Rss_feed

Google Adsense


Recent Blog Entries

by Samuel Gultom | 0 comments
by Samuel Gultom | 0 comments
by Samuel Gultom | 0 comments

Post & Promote (digg, etc.)

Alpha Search


Add to Technorati Favorites

My Stat

BlogLog

Join My Community at MyBloglog!